Comic Reviews of the Week: 2/3/2010

9 02 2010

Freddie’s Pick:

Sweet Tooth #6

Jason Aaron (writer of Scalped, PunisherMAX, Wolverine: Weapon X, etc.) would crawl over broken glass to read Sweet Tooth. I wouldn’t go that far, but Sweet Tooth is definitely one of my favorite monthly comics right now. Jeff Lemire’s art style in this issue is, as always, gorgeous and completely unique. While Lemire’s story has similarities to other titles, (The Walking Dead, Wasteland, Cormac McCarthy’s The Road) it brings a truly fresh approach to the post-apocalyptic genre, that makes it feel like your first time all over again.

This issue is the first part of a new storyline entitled “In Captivity” in which we learn a little bit about Mr. Jepperd’s violent past, among other spoilerific things. The trade collection of the first five issues is being advertised as releasing on May 18th, 2010. Do yourself a favor and don’t wait for the trade on this one. Do whatever it takes to track down the five back issues (as long as it doesn’t involve broken glass or anyone named Beardy Hornsworth) and prepare yourself for the monthly dose of awesome that is: Sweet Tooth.

Jesse’s Pick:

Ghost Riders: Heavens on Fire #6

I would love to say Jason Aaron’s final issue on Ghost Rider blew me away. While it was good, it seemed to be an anti climax to such an amazing series. The final issue sees Johnny Blaze and Danny Ketch having a showdown with rouge angel Zadkiel, the one responsible for putting the spirit in vengeance into blaze.

The showdown itself doesn’t actually see Blaze or Ketch give the final blow to the evil angel. But instead we do get to see heaven filled with thousands of Ghost Rider’s….let that image sink in a second. Now, that scene is very cool but I still wish Blaze would be the one to take out a weakened Zadkiel. It would have been a very nice bookend to the story. It does help there is a huge battle between Ghost Riders and demons at the end. I really liked the scene at the end where Danny mentions how nothing has changed even though they had won. Johnny’s answer? “Just ride.”

The issue overall is solid even if the finale is a little underwhelming. (but aren’t they all?) The artwork by Roland Boschi is very well done. When you think of the series as a whole you can’t help but smile. Jason Aaron turned Ghost Rider into a Grindhouse style, crazy, fun ride with gun wielding nuns, zombie rednecks and the sons of Satan.

When this is all collected into a trade you have to buy it, no questions, just buy it. It is one of the most innovative and fun titles you will ever come across. Though, I am a little worried of the future of Ghost Rider, I will always be able to look back at this series and see the spirit of vengeance at his best.

You don’t have to be a Ghost Rider fan when you start this journey, but by then end of this crazy ride, you will be. Thank you Jason Aaron, you made the Ghost Rider ride again.

Art’s Pick:

DEMO: Volume Two #1

My first crush was Becky Cloonan.

Not my first actual crush mind you; honestly I think I was channel surfing on a lazy Sunday back when I was twelve and saw Karen Allen in Raiders of the Ark. Or maybe it was The Sandlot. (It’s been awhile and my memory’s not the greatest, but first crush on an artist, definitely.

Sorry, Craig Thompson.

Anyways.

Let me explain…

I was off and on reading comics when I was a kid but I never really got into them until college when a few of my friends noticed a nearby comics shop. There, I took the same approach I learned from Film School — start with the best, then check out the rest. So after checking out some of the best writing I’ve ever seen by reading Watchmen and Sandman and Fables and Blankets (there are some superhero comics thrown in the mix, but it’s all a blur right now) I eventually got into the double digits and into Demo.

And into art.

And fell in love…

But now I’m rambling, which is a shame since I haven’t told you anything about Demo. Long story short, back in ’03 AiT/Planet Lar put out the twelve-issue mini based on Brian Wood’s old Marvel pitch about people with superpowers and Becky Cloonan’s fantastic art. Now the dynamic duo is back with a six-issue second volume and I just had to check it out the way it was intended.

And after a six year wait I have to say… it was good, but not great. When Wood mentioned in passing about switching formats from superhumans to the supernatural, I didn’t think much of it ’cause of Brian Wood’s track record (plus this is sort of his month with this plus the landmark issues of both Northlanders and DMZ), but the story — about a woman named Joan who is haunted by the same dream over and over so much so that she decides to do something about it — wasn’t as groundbreaking as the original concept was.

(It’s still a well told story despite the easy-to-spot plot twist, and was easily the one of best comics to come out this past week.)

And the art…

Like Cloonan’s first volume’s striking art, this volume retains the same basic black & white colors and it’s really astounding how much she does with such a simple palette. The book even keeps the special features back material that I heard about but didn’t get a chance to experience since it’s exclusive only to the single-issues. (The bonuses include Brian and Becky filling us in on the previous series, a quick look at their process, and a sneak preview of the next issue.)

So in summary: Brian’s great, Becky’s adorable, Demo’s back and it’s only $2.99.

Check it.

My first crush was Becky Cloonan…

Not my first actual crush mind you; honestly I think I

was like twelve and kept channel surfing on a lazy Sunday

until I saw Karen Allen in Raiders of the Ark. Or maybe

it was The Sandlot(it’s been awhile and my memory’s not

the greatest…) but first crush on an artist,

definitely.

Um, sorry.

Anyways.

Let me explain…

I was Off and on reading comics when I was a kid but I

never really got into them until college when a comics

shop was nearby. There, I took the same approach I

learned from Film School — start with the best, then

check out the rest. So after checking out some of the

best writing I’ve ever seen by reading Watchmen and

Sandman and Fables and Blankets (there are some superhero

comics thrown in the mix, but it’s all a blur right now)

I enventually got into the double digits and into Demo.

And into art.

But now I’m rambling, which is a shame since I haven’t

told you anything about Demo. Long story short, back in

’03 AiT/Planet Lar put out the twelve-issue mini based on

Brian Wood’s old Marvel pitch about people with

superpowers and Becky Cloonan’s fantastic art. Now the

dynamic duo is back with a six-issue second volume and I

just had to check it out the way it was intended.

And after a six year wait I have to say… it was good,

but not great. When Wood mentioned in passing about

switching formats from superhumans to the supernatural, I

didn’t think much of it ’cause of Brian Wood’s track

record (plus this is sort of his month with this plus the

landmark issues of both Northlanders and DMZ), but the

story — about a woman named Joan who is haunted by the

same dream over and over so much so that she decides to

do something about it — wasn’t as groundbreaking as the

original concept was.

(It’s still a well told story despite the easy-to-spot

plot twist, and was easily the one of best comics to come

out this past week.)

And the art…

Like Cloonan’s first volume’s striking art, this volume

retains the same basic black & white colors and it’s

really astondting how much she can do with such a simple

plate.

The book even keeps the special features back material

that I heard about but didn’t get a chance to experience

since it’s single-issue only. (The bonuses include Brian

and Becky filling us in on the previous series, their

process, and a sneak preview of the next issue.)

So in summary, Brian’s talented, Becky’s adorable, and

Demo’s back.

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15 02 2010
CBR give their thoughts on GR:HOF 6

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